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High Lonesome Strings

Sunday, January 29, 2006

2:00 PM

Greensboro Cultural Center
Band Rehearsal Hall, bottom floor
200 N. Davie Street
Greensboro NC 27401

Bring instrument for jam sessions

Sponsored by Music Center City Arts

Featuring:
Arnie Solomon with Beaconwood & Friends


Bennett Sullivan, Arnie Solomon, Eric Robertson, Ryan Stanford,
Bert Sprye and Tim Smith
Every creative artist has within him a special muse that nurtures his soul and enlarges the dimensions of his being. For Arnie Solomon – New Yorker by birth, high school administrator by profession, Southerner by choice- that muse has been, for the past quarter century, the mandolin- the bluegrass mandolin.

In Ed Solomon, Arnie was blessed with a father who appreciated bluegrass music. Arnie had already heard Bill Monroe perform before, at a park in Pennsylvania, but the time Monroe played at a YMCA in Manhattan proved a turning point in Arnie’s eleven-year-old life. Arnie was so taken with Bill’s performance of “White House Blues” and his informal lesson with Bill backstage, that he then and there decided to play the mandolin.

The mandolin stayed close to Arnie during most of his free moments from then on. Ed affectionately recalls Arnie cradling the mandolin on his lap while he was watching television, so he could play it during commercials. Before long, Arnie began appearing on stage with Roger Sprung who was well known for the number and diversity of musical styles he would assay. Thus, even before he was ready to play lead “breaks,” Arnie was becoming comfortable and conversant with many musical styles from many lands.

New York City in the 1960’s was home to David Grisman and Andy Statman, and Frank Wakefield would play there frequently. All three are brilliant, trailblazing Mandolinists, and all three were exhibiting fully developed alternatives to Monroe’s original bluegrass style. Arnie would later become especially taken with Grisman’s “Dawg” music during his college years, and he credits David with showing him by example to play his best but not to overplay. But, from the time he studiously learned Monroe’s “Rawhide” during his eighth grade year until present, Bill Monroe has remained Arnie Solomon’s chief mentor and musical influence. “You’ll notice,” Arnie says, “that no matter how far out I go, I always come back to bluegrass.”

Arnie had already written his first mandolin tune, “Metro,” when he entered college at Oneonta, N.Y. There, he met Will Lunn, a fine musician who helped found the Peaceful Valley Festival. (Arnie and Will would also perform at that festival, as members of The High Street Boys.) Arnie would gain a lot of experience during those years and taking a course in jazz further broadened his musical horizons.

As his career took him to various locations, Arnie, as they say, “kept his chops up.” When there were good bands to join, he joined them. When they broke up, he kept on playing for his own enjoyment. In fact, based on how few bands he has been a member of, and how little recording he has done, Arnie has come to regard himself as an “underground” mandolin player. But by no means was Arnie aloof or reclusive. A principal musical oasis for him has been the venerable Galax, Va., Fiddlers’ Convention, not far from Arnie’s Greensboro, N.C. home. For the past thirty four years, the second weekend in August has always found Arnie in the Felts Park parking lot, “jamming late into the night.” In fact, almost all the supporting pickers heard in this collection are musicians Arnie first met during these jam sessions. Arnie usually found time to enter the mandolin competition as well. For two years he placed first, but the vagaries of contest judging being what they are, it’s more significant to note that he has placed among the top ten entrants in the mandolin competition fourteen times, more often than anyone else in the entire 60-plus-year history of the convention itself. (Yet Arnie, with characteristic diffidence, has stated he does not regard himself as a “contest” mandolin player.)

A full-time job in most fields usually includes a two to four week annual vacation. In the education business, however, a full-time job can mean time off at Christmas and summer, time that Arnie Solomon has used propitiously, traveling overseas on many occasions. Like his mentor, Bill Monroe, Arnie’s truelife experiences have yielded distinctive musical compositions. People who know and care the most about bluegrass mandolin playing have long recognized that Arnie Solomon, in his self-professed “underground” fashion, is one of its finest practitioners.

High Lonesome Strings is blessed to have Arnie as a member since its beginning in 1997. Come on out January 28th to hear him perform. Joining him will be Beaconwood and Friends. The friends are Tim Smith on Fiddle and Bert Sprye on Bass. Beaconwood consists of Eric Robertson, Ryan Stanfield, and Bennett Sullivan.

Tim Smith learned to play the fiddle from his grandfather Kilby Reeves who, it just so happens, also taught Art Wooten, Bill Monroe's first fiddle player. When he was younger, Tim used to compete in fiddler’s conventions and in 1977, he won first place in fiddle at the Galax Fiddler’s Convention and in 1978, he won the World Champion Fiddler award at Union Grove. He has played with The Bluegrass Cardinals, Charlie Waller and the Country Gentlemen, L. W. Lambert and the Blue River Boys, Jim and Jesse, Bill Monroe, and Lester Flatt and has performed on 27 recordings. Tim also studied classical violin and currently teaches violin, fiddle, guitar and mandolin privately.


High Lonesome Strings Monthly Meeting
Sunday, February 26, 2006 at 2:00 PM

Greensboro Cultural Center
Band Rehearsal Hall, bottom floor
200 N. Davie Street
Greensboro NC 27401

Bring instrument for jam sessions

Sponsored by Music Center City Arts

Featuring:
Mel Jones and His Bag of Bones


Mel Jones and His Bag of Bones
Mel Jones, born & raised in Chapel Hill, NC with the blues in his blood, toured as a drummer and singer performing rock & roll and rhythm & blues for years in the Southeast before he discovered the hotbed of bluegrass and old time music deep in the heart of Western North Carolina. Picking up harmonica and venturing on to a new realm of music proved to be just another stop on the musical path for Jones. He formed the first Bag O’Bones and the Piedmont blues duo of Wicker and Jones with finger style guitarist Danny Wicker in the early 1990’s and began a new career in acoustic music. Now he finds himself soulfully connected to traditional blues combining all his musical influences to create well-rounded performances that prove blues, jazz, and a little humor go a long way. The "Bones" have taken on many forms to become the powerhouse masters of acoustic blues that they showcase today. Jones has established himself as one of the region’s best harmonica players by winning numerous titles in regional festivals and earning a solid reputation for showmanship. He is also an accomplished songwriter, with recordings that feature much of his original work in Livin’ Bones, Blues from the Porch, When the Alligators Come to Town, and Bones to Pick.

Don Story is from the acoustic music Mecca of Wilkesboro, NC where he is widely known as one of the finest guitarists in Western North Carolina. A lifelong professional musician, he recorded his first session as a drummer at age fourteen. Since then he has toured the Southern US with an array of blues, rock, and bluegrass bands most notably his own Split Decision in the ‘80’s and most recently with Don Story and The Fried Pies, as well as, R.G. Absher and Extra Measure. A Merlefest regular, he is highly sought as a teacher, session man, and stage performer.

Dan Campbell, three time winner of the World Champion Bassist title of the annual Union Grove Fiddler’s Convention, started on a one-string wash tub bass with his Dad, Larry Campbell. Performing on tour soon established Dan as one of the most talented bass men in Bluegrass music. Performing alongside legends such as Don Reno, Bill Harrell & the Tennessee Cutups, as well as L. W. Lambert & the Blue River Boys. His romping bass licks have also made it to the same stage as Emmylou Harris, Ricky Skaggs, the Whites, and Jerry Douglas. Dan’s musical influences include Tom Grey, John Palmer, George & John Shuffler, Allen Mills, and Pete Corum.

Kip Snow, originally from Elkin, NC now lives in Mocksville, NC where he owns and operates Counterpoint Studios, a music store known for its fine teaching facility. He has played music since he was old enough to hold an instrument and is a master of mandolin, guitar and banjo in a variety of styles from jazz and rock to bluegrass and country. A founding member of Dixie Creek Revival, he has appeared on the same stage with The Country Gentlemen, Doyle Lawson, J.D. Crowe, and Keith Whitley.


High Lonesome Strings Monthly Meeting
Sunday, March 26, 2006 at 2:00 PM

Greensboro Cultural Center
Band Rehearsal Hall, bottom floor
200 N. Davie Street
Greensboro NC 27401

Bring instrument for jam sessions

Sponsored by Music Center City Arts

Featuring:
The Misty Valley Boys


The Misty Valley Boys
The Misty Valley Boys- Adam, Roger, Steve and Lynwood are four Piedmont country boys playing the music they grew up on. The area is known for its unique fusion of string country and gospel music. Piedmont style has been called a musician’s music, and that level of talent and skill is what audiences expect from The Misty Valley Boys.

Each of the band members is an accomplished, hardworking career musician. The scope of their talent and experience is amazing. Added together, the boys in the band have 101 years experience performing, they play 14 instruments, sing all vocal parts, and have 12 songwriting and 24 recording credits.

Together they have dedicated their musical lives to bringing Bluegrass Piedmont style to audiences far beyond the Piedmont region they call home. The Misty Valley Boys play the finest Piedmont Style Bluegrass you will hear within the region or beyond. The Piedmont region runs from Maryland to Georgia, from the eastern foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains to the coastal plain.

Their beautiful, harmonious vocals and mastery of the Piedmont style touch people the way bluegrass did 40 years ago. The Misty Valley Boys love what they do, and it shows.


EXTRA! EXTRA! Read all about it.....

High Lonesome Strings
Sunday, April 23, 2006
2:00 PM

Hagan-Stone Park
5920 Hagan-Stone Park Road
Pleasant Garden NC 27313

Bring instrument for jam sessions
Sponsored by Hagan-Stone Park
Featuring:
Southeast Express

The bluegrass band, "Southeast Express" was originally formed in the late 70's by Mr. LeRoy Gregory of Julian, N.C. Unfortunately Mr. Gregory was injured in a rodeo accident in 1994 and later passed away from those injuries. Today they are proud to carry on the band that he started in honor of him and the music that he loved!

The group is currently made up of the following members: Jim Boren of Pleasant Garden, N.C. on Dobro, guitar and vocals; Ray Coble of Julian, N.C. on bass and vocals; Dale Giddens of Julian on guitar and vocals; and Joe Norris of Julian on mandolin and vocals. Danny Bowers of Midway, N.C. on banjo and fiddle will be performing with the band at this monthly meeting. He will be replaced by Bennett Sullivan at future engagements.

The group performs traditional, Gospel and contemporary bluegrass with a little comedy thrown in and an occasional country or rock and roll song for variety. They have recorded three projects:

"Southeast Express"
"On Track"
"Back To The Cross" (all Gospel)

One of the band’s main goals is to praise God through Gospel music and at the same time to inspire and entertain people and bring joy to them through their music!

Southeast Express would like to carry on the "bluegrass tradition" for a long time to come!

This will be the 15th performance by Southeast Express at High Lonesome Strings events. They played at our very first monthly meeting on July 27, 1997. I want to personally thank the band for all the great music that they have shared with High Lonesome Strings over the years.


High Lonesome Strings Day at Brown's Ole Opry

Saturday, June 10, 2006

6:00 PM

Timber Mill Road
off McLeansville Rd
½ mile North of McLeansville
McLeansville NC

Come on out and support High Lonesome Strings at Brown’s Ole Opry! At 10:00 PM, the stage will be open to anyone who wants to jam. Plus plenty of Pickin outside!

Performance Schedule:
6PM Bishop’s Bridge
7PM The Fabulous Grass
8PM The Board of Directors
9PM Hwy 61
10PM Open Stage


The Board of Directors: Jeff Wiseman, Kent Huffman,
Wayne Childress, Greg Eldred, Pammy Davis,
Ed Sullivan, Brent Fain, Susan Roush

Hwy 61: Mike Whittington, Harold Shelley,
Susan Owen, Don Thomas, Travis Graves,
Bentley Owen

The Fabulous Grass: Pete Verges, Rick Gribbons,
Lynn Jones, Cecil Carroll, Marie Vanderbeck,
Lynn Hargrove

Bishop's Bridge: (Back Row) Asa Archer, Tom O'Shay, David Gibson (Front Row) Sara Rosenblatt, Jamie Forbes, Vance Archer

EXTRA! EXTRA! Read all about it.....

Jake Hiatt, Sidney Watson, Josh Hazelwood,
Allan McMillian, Matthew McMillian
High Lonesome Strings
Sunday, July 23, 2006
2:00 PM

Hagan-Stone Park
5920 Hagan-Stone Park Road
Pleasant Garden NC 27313

Bring instrument for jam sessions
Sponsored by Hagan-Stone Park
Featuring:
Cornerstone

Josh Hazelwood

Hi, my name is Josh Hazelwood. I am 28 years old and reside in Dobson, N.C. I attend Bear Creek Baptist Church. I play the dobro and do most of the lead singing for Cornerstone (formerly known as Cody Creek). I also play the guitar and bass. I began my musical journey at age 6 when I learned to play the guitar from my dad's teachings along with my grandpa, a southern Baptist preacher. I played the guitar in churches and radio broadcasts up until I was about 18 years old. By that time, my brother Tim and my cousin Chris had both learned to play instruments so we formed a bluegrass gospel group named The Sojourners that consisted of me, Tim, Chris, both my grandparents, and Brandon, one of my brothers friends that also played guitar. We traveled around to numerous churches and played together for about eight years up until two years ago when family and new children kind of slowed us all down. So I played with several bands after that for the past two years until April of this year, 2006, when my good friend Sidney Watson (banjo player for Cornerstone) and I began thinking of starting our own band.
We had some friends that we had played with before and one by one we began to ask them if they would be interested in joining up with us to form the group "Cody Creek." They said yes so we started practicing and playing some shows and conventions. Then just recently, we all made a joint decision to just play gospel music and to rename the band "Cornerstone." I am very grateful to the Lord for my musical talents and I would rather play for Him than do anything. I enjoy spending my spare time with my girlfriend Laura Miller, whom I have dated for 16 months. We plan to get married during 2007. So here we are and we look forward to seeing and playing for you on July 23, 2006 at Hagan-Stone Park. Thanks for the invite and we'll see you soon! God bless!

Jake Hiatt

Hi, my name is Jake Hiatt. I am sixteen years old and I reside in Bannertown, N.C. I play the guitar and sing bass for Cornerstone. I also play banjo and bass and I teach guitar lessons at Olde Mill Music in Mount Airy. I also enjoy youth activities with my church such as mission trips and I also like to play golf. I attend Bannertown Baptist Church. I've been playing guitar for about 6 years and I've played in numerous bluegrass and gospel bands, filling in for musicians when they couldn’t make it. I attend Mount Airy High School and I am active with the golf team. My musical journey started when I was eleven years old. I wanted to learn to play guitar so my parents bought me one for Christmas. I play a 2002 Martin HD28 dreadnought guitar. My great grandmother showed me a few chords and for the next year I learned every chord I could find. After that, I took lessons from a local teacher for about 2 years. I live with my parents (Chris and Melissa Hiatt) and my two sisters (Scarlett and Rachel). I really enjoy playing with this band and I look forward to seeing you on July 23. See you soon!

Allan McMillian

Hi, my name is Allan McMillian. I am 23 years old and I reside in Cana V.A. I play mandolin for Cornerstone. I've been playing mandolin for about 4 1/2 years. Before Cornerstone, I played with a group called New Edition for a little over a year. In my spare time, when I'm not playing music, I enjoy racing motorcycles on dirt tracks. I also have a road bike that I enjoy cruising on. The mandolin I play mainly is a Gibson Sam Bush model and I also have a Gibson Flatiron. Both of them are F style mandolins. I also have a 1929 model Gibson A-5 mandolin that was my grandpa’s. My musical interest just came one day when I decided I wanted to learn to play the mandolin. I also play a little guitar and banjo. Some of my musical influences are Adam Steffey with the group, Mountain Heart and the legendary Bill Monroe. That's a little bit about me but I'm looking forward to playing for you on July 23rd. See ya soon!

Matthew McMillian

Hi, my name is Matthew McMillian. I am twenty-three years old and I reside in White Plains, N.C. I play bass fiddle and sing tenor for Cornerstone. I also play guitar. My musical interest started about 10 years ago when I wanted to learn to play guitar. I played guitar for a while and my interest in music eventually led me to the bass guitar. From there, I started singing bass with a local southern gospel quartet. I sang with them for about 2 years. After that, I got the opportunity to play with the legendary Easter Brothers bluegrass gospel group. I played with them for about 2 1/2 years. In that time, they taught me a lot about playing and singing and most importantly to stay near to Him that has redeemed us, Jesus Christ. I'm very thankful for that opportunity. I left the Easter Brothers because I wanted to pursue a career in law enforcement. I am currently attending Surry Community College and I'm enrolled in B.L.E.T. (basic law enforcement training). I am engaged to my fiancé Christy and we plan to marry on September 2, 2006. I enjoy playing with the guys of Cornerstone and we look forward to seeing you on July 23. God bless!

Sidney Watson

Hi my name is Sidney Watson. I am 23 years old and reside in Lowgap, N.C. I play the banjo and sing baritone for the group Cornerstone. I also play guitar and mandolin. I began playing banjo at age 13 and have now been playing for 10 years. I think bluegrass music is the best music there is. I am currently engaged to my fiance Breanne and we plan to marry in March of 2007. I am a member of New Grace Baptist church and I am active with the youth group there. In June 2000, I began playing with the legendary Easter brothers. I traveled with them for 4 years and played alongside numerous professional bands such as: Mountain Heart, Primitive Quartet, Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver. I played the banjo and sang bass for them. In 2004, I wanted a break from the road so I left the Easter brothers. For the past 2 years I have filled in with numerous local bands. In April 2006, Josh Hazelwood and I began thinking of starting our own band. We started as Cody Creek and recently changed our name to Cornerstone. I'm just thankful to my Savior for the gift of music and the opportunity to play with this band. Thanks for inviting us and we look forward to seeing you on July 23. God bless you!

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